agenda Thu Nov 2: more Proof

learning goal: what working title creatively captures my working main idea?

Mr. Brown’s prospectus, etc.

work forward on your essay, using the format of Mr. Brown’s current work on his essay

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agenda Mon Oct 30: problems in proof

learning goal: Where do you see problems in David Auburn’s play PROOF?  Which are major, and which minor? How are they related?  Does the play’s title suggest answers to any of these questions?

Group T

Group NY

group work: beats, problems, table ideas

The main goal of today’s exercises is to lead people toward the writing of prospectus, which is due before we meet next–i.e., Thu Nov 2.

possible PROOF topics generated by Mr. Brown.  You very likely will produce other possibilities.  I recommend working with a question that your writing will explore.

 

Beat Example (Mr. Brown) for Act One, Scene 1

beat 1: Catherine, Robert’s spirit; pp.5-12 (“bad sign”); focal point–Catherine’s worried conversation with herself about pressure from her father, wanting to be and not wanting to be like him, seems worn out by this conversation and what it represents

beat 2: Catherine, Hal; pp.12-18 (“No, you”); focal point–her fear and their mutual mistrust Hal wants to read thru R’s ntbks, but Catherine doesn’t want him to, she’s afraid and suspicious, while he wants to do this for the world of math; she insists they contain nothing, and he insists back, claiming she would not recognize valuable entries;

beat 3: Catherine, Hal; pp.18-20; focal point: C’s anger and H’s wanting to show/help Catherine, he tries to help, but she doesn’t want it, doesn’t trust it

 

 

agenda Thu Oct 26: proving solutions

learning goal: who is the most able problem-solver in David Auburn’s play? Can you prove it?

The following process accommodates today’s various activities–e.g., field trips, college visits, etc.  From the worksheet, you will see that you can navigate these steps on your own or with partner(s).  The sheet asks you to identify how you produce your results.

step 1: “To think like a mathematician means to . . . “: consolidate your previously-brainstormed responses onto the worksheet, entering five to ten of the most significant entries

step 2: on the worksheet, identify five to ten ways the play PROOF completes the phrase “to think like a mathematician means to . . . ” Look for lines from the play, irrespective of your entries in Step 1. In other words, be open to new ideas.  Lines from the play can either directly or indirectly indicate how a character thinks like a mathematician.

step 3: in the corresponding column, copy a brief passage from the play that supports each entry from step 2, trying to represent a range of scenes from throughout the play

step 4: in the column named “to think like a playwright is to . . . ,” make five to ten entries–based on your reading of this play by David Auburn

step 5: submit your worksheet to TURNITIN before our next class on Mon Oct 30 (PROOF table.30Oct17)

proof.problem solvers.26Oct17

 

 

first blog post by end of October

Expected topic: a significant contemporary issue illuminated by Shelley’s novel?

Instructions: adapt an idea from your Frankenstein essay for this first blog post.  Your audience for this post is wider than that for the essay.  In other words, you are writing for the general public–about a significant contemporary issue.  You are leaving the land of literary analysis, and entering the region of social and cultural commentary.  Decide which idea you want to express.  Then decide how to adapt the expression for blog post.  (Keep in mind the general idea behind this blog.  The phrase “lit matters” captures this idea.  In other words, the literature we study examines aspects of the human condition–aspects that we still experience today.) The goal of this post is to express your idea as clearly as possible, while making the case that this idea somehow matters.   Approximate length: 400 words.

Ideally, include an image with your post–an image that reflects your idea, either literally or figuratively.

Stitched Panorama

agenda Wed Oct 18: to think, F revisited, start PROOF

learning goal: what does it mean to think like ___________________ ?

in grps: play guessing game by listing brainstormed items from side 2 of your think-like-a-mathematician sheet (5′)

also in grps: have a conversation about mb post (15′)

whole class: report out from groups (5-10′)

individually: leave thoughtful, respectful comment on mb post (15′)

whole class: start PROOF (with time left)

 

email today from Mr. Barton:

Dear Colleagues,

I’ve been reading Moving the Rock – Seven Levers We Can Press to Transform Education by Grant Lichtman.  I was struck by a passage in the book that I want to pass on to you simply as food for thought and dialogue.

If there is a single fatal symptom in the flawed system of traditional education it is the lack of relevance that students feel for the reason behind what they are doing for all of those hours, days, and years at school….

Paul Barton

Head of School

Revision Protocol

YOU MAY USE THE FOLLOWING PROTOCOL ANYTIME DURING THIS SEMESTER,
AS LONG AS YOU SUBMIT THE INITIAL ANNOTATED RUBRIC BY Mon Dec 4, 2017.
If you have received below a 90% on a TURNITIN assignment and want to revise for an average of the two scores, download and print the corresponding rubric from the links below, or  from the Canvas page called “rubrics, templates, models.”
On this rubric, identify the assignment you want to revise.
Check the same boxes of this rubric that I did on TURNITIN.  On the BACK of the sheet, explain your specific plans for revision, based on the rubric and my marginal comments, both Quickmarks and other comments.
Hand the completed sheet to me, and wait for its return before you start revising.
 

Once you have submitted your revised assignment to TURNITIN, return the approved rubric to me, as a signal for me to assess the new version.

SPECIAL NOTE: YOU ARE ELIGIBLE TO REVISE A SECOND ASSIGNMENT ONLY AFTER HAVING COMPLETED THE FIRST REVISION.  A REVISION IS COMPLETE, ONCE YOU HAVE RETURNED THE ANNOTATED RUBRIC.